our bench sponsorship program

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Imagine being the one to jumpstart an artist's career.

It's a thing.

Not everyone has the financial ability to start their career as a jeweler. That is why we created our sponsorship program. We have collaborated with The institute of american indian arts to work with recent graduates who want to take the next step in their career.

Through the generosity of community members, we were able to donate two bench spaces to Two students for an entire year as soon as we opened our Santa Fe location. 

It doesn't have to stop there though through donations, we are able to provide additional classes, resources, tools, and studio space to those who need it. 

 

I believe in this cause and want to be a part of it.

A very special thank you to our current sponsors: 

Rio Grande Jewelry Supply

Timothy Sheriff


Meet Our Current Sponsored Artists, Amber and Jacqueline.

 Amber Byars is a Choctaw artist and activist from Santa Fe, New Mexico. She is currently a senior at the Institute of American Indian Arts and will graduate in December of 2018 with a Bachelor of Arts in Indigenous Liberal Studies and an Associates Fine Arts in Studio Arts. She comes from a family of artists. Her father is a stone sculptor, dancer, actor, and filmmaker. Her mother is a painter and a writer. She has come into our studio with a fiery passion of continuing to perfect and hone her craft. We are lucky to have her.

Amber Byars is a Choctaw artist and activist from Santa Fe, New Mexico. She is currently a senior at the Institute of American Indian Arts and will graduate in December of 2018 with a Bachelor of Arts in Indigenous Liberal Studies and an Associates Fine Arts in Studio Arts. She comes from a family of artists. Her father is a stone sculptor, dancer, actor, and filmmaker. Her mother is a painter and a writer. She has come into our studio with a fiery passion of continuing to perfect and hone her craft. We are lucky to have her.

 Jacqueline Berg fell in love with jewelry making in 2009 when she took a lapidary class at a Mining and Mineral Museum on a whim. Sadly, the museum closed a few months after she became involved and she wasn't able to touch jewelry until her acceptance into IAIA (Institute of American Indian Arts). She has discovered a means of self-empowerment through making her own jewelry and creates pieces that are versatile and genderless, often utilizing heavy textural details and more unique materials such as animal parts that she harvests and processes herself. She brings her energy and originality into the studio every day. We love seeing her progress and variation of pieces.

Jacqueline Berg fell in love with jewelry making in 2009 when she took a lapidary class at a Mining and Mineral Museum on a whim. Sadly, the museum closed a few months after she became involved and she wasn't able to touch jewelry until her acceptance into IAIA (Institute of American Indian Arts). She has discovered a means of self-empowerment through making her own jewelry and creates pieces that are versatile and genderless, often utilizing heavy textural details and more unique materials such as animal parts that she harvests and processes herself. She brings her energy and originality into the studio every day. We love seeing her progress and variation of pieces.